Coloring Grayscale Aerial Images of Eilat’s Coral Reef

Death of coral reefs around the world and in the Gulf of Eilat in particular, is a complex problem that has diverse origins: from rising water temperatures to various pollutants. It can indicate of serious ecological problems. The processes of bleaching and sand covering corals can take many years. A research in the University of Haifa and the Institute for the Study of Seas and Lakes tries to understand the process on the scale of decades.
There are aerial photographs of the Gulf of Eilat from the 1950s to the present day in which the coral reefs appear. Until the 1990s photographs were taken from various cameras, some scanned from developed images and all in black and white. The problem facing Dr. Yoav Lehan and Doctoral student Elad Shalev is the coloring of these black and white images to better understand their content and present them aesthetically. The coloring must make sense to a human viewer, be aesthetic and preserve the texture of the gray image.
As a solution to the problem presented to us, we chose to train an architecture called Real-time user-guided image colorization with learned deep priors which allows black and white images to be colorized without loss of texture and allows the user to correct errors in the final painting as needed. This solution led to reliable painting and no loss of texture.

Coloring Grayscale Aerial Images of Eilat’s Coral Reef

Collaboration:

The University of Haifa

The Institute for the Study of Seas and Lakes