Real Time Control of Hand Prosthesis using Surface EMG

In the USA alone, there are 500,000 below the elbow amputees. The causes vary from trauma, disease, or congenital conditions. Since this condition has a significant impact on the daily functionality of these people, the use of a hand prosthesis can assist in regaining the lost functionality. The current solutions are far from perfect, due to both the price and functionality range. Current hand prostheses range from mechanical prostheses, allowing only a single movement and costing several thousand dollars, to myoelectric prostheses, a prosthetic hand powered by Electromyography (EMG) which allows several movement types but with a price range of 20,000$ and up.

Real Time Control of Hand Prosthesis Using Surface EMG

In the USA alone, there are 500,000 below the elbow amputees. The causes vary from trauma, disease, or congenital conditions. Since this condition has a significant impact on the daily functionality of these people, the use of a hand prosthesis can assist in regaining the lost functionality. The current solutions are far from perfect, due to both the price and functionality range. Current hand prostheses range from mechanical prostheses, allowing only a single movement and costing several thousand dollars, to myoelectric prostheses, a prosthetic hand powered by Electromyography (EMG) which allows several movement types but with a price range of 20,000$ and up. These high costs mean that many people around the world, especially in the developing world, cannot afford such solutions. This is especially problematic for children amputees since new prostheses are needed as the child grows, which can accumulate to very high costs. Current solutions for the problem are mostly provided by non-profit organizations such as e-NABLE, which offers free online blueprints for printing single action prostheses in 3D printers, costing only 50$. However, these prostheses are limited in their functionality and are capable of performing only a single movement (closing of the hand).

Real Time Control of Hand Prosthesis Using Surface EMG
Real Time Control of Hand Prosthesis
Using Surface EMG
Collaboration:

Oscar Lichtenstein1